DNR Q & A: What is being done to stop the spread of emerald ash borer in Minnesota?

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources field staff, resource managers and the DNR Information Center staff answer many questions every day about natural resources topics. Here is one of them:

Q.  What is being done to stop the spread of emerald ash borer in Minnesota?

A.  Cities with known infestations are taking infested trees down and grinding the wood for use as biofuel. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture has released stingless wasps that eat ash borer eggs and larvae. The agency also traps ash borer with guidance from the U.S. Forest Service.  The University of Minnesota is researching cold tolerance among both emerald ash borer and their parasitoids (wasps), and also exploring forest management options to maintain forest health and function after ash trees die. The DNR is working to prepare cities and townships to deal with emerald ash borer once it arrives in their communities.  The combination of these methods has kept ash borer population numbers relatively low in Minnesota and has successfully slowed the rate of spread within the state.

--Susan Burks, DNR invasive species program coordinator

For more information, call the DNR information line at 296-6157 or go to the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us.

 

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