Leisure & Lifestyle

Mon
25
Aug

Blue skies and blue bonnets


This B-25 Mitchell, the most-heavily-armed warplane in World War II, may also have been its most versatile. It was used for high- and low-level bombing, some aerial fighting, strafing, photoreconaissance and submarine patrol. Other exhibits include one of the Japanese one-man submarines spotted in Pearl Harbor -- by ships carrying Minnesotan sailors -- just before the Dec. 7, 1941 attack. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

Red corn poppies, yellow California poppies and Texas bluebonnets flourish in the gardens of Wildseed Farms in Fredericksburg, Texas. The company is the nation’s largest producer of wildflower seeds and ships seeds all over the world. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

A “Sunday house” at the Pioneer Museum complex in Fredericksburg. These tiny, picturesque cottages were where German immigrants in the 1800s spent weekends in town. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

The unimposing main street of downtown Fredericksburg features boutiques, interesting restaurants and what’s described as a “bland, unimpressive” building that opens into a state-of-the-art World War II museum with a priceless collection of exhibits. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

The toll paid in lives in World War II’s Pacific theater is illustrated in photos and firsthand accounts at the the National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

In his tasting room, Ken Maxwell, owner of Torre di Pietra Vineyards and Winery in Fredericksburg, serves wine samples for guests and talks about his wine making. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

Shrimp and crab cakes with guava and kiwi salsa made up one of several small plates at the Navajo Grill in Fredericksburg. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

The trails around Enchanted Rock, a huge pink granite dome just north of Fredericksburg, are popular with hikers. (Pamela O’Meara/Review)

Tiny Fredericksburg’s take on history, outdoor activities and food is as big as all Texas
Fredericksburg, Texas, in the Texas hill country, is one of the best-kept secrets in travel. This small town offers visitors a menu of options. Take the kids or grandkids in the summer to see the National Museum of the Pacific War, which has earned rave reviews from ages 9 to 90 for its engaging look at the experience of World War II. Go with friends to browse the boutiques, relax in the spas, visit picturesque homes and historic buildings and tour the wineries. Or, even better, plan a winter getaway to this temperate region for hiking and biking, rock climbing, year-round golfing and seasonal birding tours. Shoppers and diners will find it’s a haven for artists, a treasure trove of antiques and a spot for gourmet dining and specialty foods.
 

Thu
07
Aug

Tips to generate a second income

In today’s economy, a full-time job is no guarantee that a second income won’t be necessary to live a comfortable lifestyle or save for the future.

Mon
04
Aug

Kidney disease is on the rise: what you need to know


Portable, home hemodialysis is giving patients like Henning Sondergaard independence. (submitted photo)

Kidney disease is on the rise, according to government statistics.

Mon
28
Jul

Painted ponies go up and down


Catch up on the remarkable story of how Nancy Peterson and Peter Boehm kept the carousel in one piece and in St. Paul at ourcarousel.org, then come and meet them at the carousel’s 100th birthday party Aug. 9 at Como Park. Below, Carousel horses are either “standers” or “jumpers. At Cafesjian’s Carousel in Como Park, all 68 horses are “jumpers” meaning they move up and down. (photos by Linda E. Andersen/Review)

Volunteer crafts people painstakingly scraped off layers of dark paint - and repainted the original colors - on those spots on the horses where children’s boots and buckles had worn through the painted finishes.

Everyone is invited to the 100th birthday party for Cafesjian’s Carousel, which will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9, at the carousel’s location, right next to the Marjorie McNeeley Conservatory in Como Park. There will be birthday cake and root beer floats, while singers and face painters entertain visitors. A brief ceremony will take place at 3 p.m., and rides will be free from 4 until 6 p.m.

It’s 100 years for Como Park’s Cafesjian’s Carousel
When Nancy Peterson heard the news that cold November day in 1988 that the long-time Minnesota classic carousel had been dismantled and 20 of the horses and a chariot were now on their way to the auction block in New York City, she remembers saying to her husband, “Somebody ought to do something!” 
 

Thu
24
Jul

Talk to teens about driving -- it may be a lifesaver

The ultimate goal when our kids start driving is to ensure their safety and the safety of others. That starts with establishing expectations. The good news is that by setting boundaries, we are making the roads safer for everyone.

Mon
21
Jul

Raspberries: ripe for the picking


What better dessert in the summer than a fresh-fruit pie? Take it along on a picnic or serve it at a neighborhood get-together. (Linda Baumeister/Review)

Whip up a quick raspberry sauce to top ice cream or cake with a fresh tang.

A new way to enjoy raspberries — as raspberry schnapps, a smooth liqueur for sipping.

Three fruits at their July peaks combine in this pie: raspberries, blueberries and peaches. You can use more or less of each, as your tastes or backyard harvest dictate.

‘Tis the season... to harvest the delicious, nutritious, pretty red raspberry.

Wed
16
Jul

Maplewood illustrator recreates classic fables


Mike Wilke, writer and illustrator for Cornerstone Stories, says his favorite fable he’s done is “The Bearded Fool,” a story about a man who decides to burn part of his beard off after reading that all men with long beards are fools. “I did relate to it,” Wilke laughs. (Kaylin Creason/Review)

Maplewood illustrator Mike Wilke exhibits comics from his book “Watermelon Bones: The Sequel.” (Kaylin Creason/Review)

Political cartoonist Mike Wilke, 58, has been drawing for most of his life, but he’s never done anything like this. For the past year, Wilke has been illustrating fables for children’s books.

Tue
15
Jul

Fly, fish and float at Lake of the Ozarks


photos by Pamela O’Meara

At the Lake of the Ozarks, a great blue heron flies near the bluffs on the shore near the blooming redbud trees.

Jack Uxa of Jack’s Guide Service beams as he holds up two largemouth bass he caught in Lake of the Ozarks.

This colorful salad of chicken, tomatoes, corn and black beans was featured at H. Toad’s Bar and Grill at Camden on the Lake Resort.

In the early 1900s, a wealthy Kansas City businessman chose a hilltop near Lake of the Oaarks to build a sprawling retreat resembling a European castle. Years later the castle caught fire and only the stone ruins remain in what is now Ha Ha Tonka State Park.

The green leaves against the turquoise water are found at the scenic spring in Ha Ha Tonka State Park.

Like over 2,400 people before them, Susan and Steve Pollack renewed their wedding vows in the spectacular Bridal Cave near the Lake of the Ozarks.

For years, friends have been talking about their boating, fishing and wine tasting trips to the beautiful resort area of the Lake of the Ozarks in central Missouri, and I wanted to go, too.

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